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CNA Salary Expectations - 2020

CNA Salary Expectations - 2020

Victoria Young
Victoria Young

Quick Overview: What is a CNA?

Certified Nursing Assistants or Aides (CNAs) provide compassionate care to clients in facilities such as nursing homes, assisted living facilities, and local hospitals. As a CNA, you will work under the supervision of a Registered Nurse (RN) or Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) in assisting clients with basic daily activities, including:

  • Taking temperature and vital signs
  • Documenting important information about patients
  • Bathing and hygiene care
  • Dressing
  • Eating and drinking
  • Mobility, such a turning or repositioning bedridden patients

To find CNA jobs, be sure to visit our jobs page to find new and exciting Certified Nursing Assistant and Certified Nursing Aide jobs and opportunities. You can also upload your resume to make it easier for employers to find you.

CNA Salary

CNA pay is determined by a few different factors. Your type of employer, payment structure, your skills and qualifications, and where you work will all influence how much you earn as a CNA. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the average salary for a CNA was $28,540 per year in 2018.

 

Type of employer

As a CNA, your sector employment affects your earning potential. The median annual wages for CNAs in the top-paying industries include:

  • Government: $33,800 per year
  • Hospitals (state, local, and private): $30,050 per year
  • Nursing care facilities (skilled nursing facilities): $27,840 per year
  • Home healthcare services: $27,290 per year
  • Continuing care retirement communities and assisted living facilities for the elderly: $27,200 per year

Payment structure

Pay rate can also change according to the schedule that you work. CNAs who work for a set number of hours per week generally earn an annual salary. To work overtime, salaried CNAs can find work subject to the needs of the hospital and the offer contract. However, because CNAs paid on an hourly scale are able to take as many shifts as their schedule permits, it is easier to work extra shifts.

Skills and qualifications

According to Payscale, there are some critical skills and qualifications that you can obtain to boost your CNA salary.

  • Telemetry skills help you earn up to 7% more than the average base salary.
  • Acute Care skills can boost your salary by 4%.
  • Medicine/Surgery skills can raise your earning potential by 4%.
  • Hospice skills can increase your salary by 3%.
  • Emergency Room (ER) skills can raise your salary by 3%.
  • Geriatrics skills help you earn an additional 2%.
  • Intensive Care Unit (ICU) skills can improve your earnings by 2%.
  • Long Term Care skills can raise your take-home pay by 2%.

For more information, read our tips for raising your income as a CNA.

Location

Finally, pay rate is affected by where you choose to live and work. In general, areas with a higher cost of living will yield higher average hourly rates.

By city

At the city level, big cities in metropolitan areas tend to pay higher for nursing assistants. These are some of the highest paying cities for CNAs:

  • In San Francisco, CA, a CNA can expect to make $21.83 per hour for a total of $44,260 per year. 
  • In Salinas, CA, a CNA can expect to make $20.47 per hour for a total of $42,590 per year.
  • In Fairbanks, AK, a CNA can expect to make $19.57 per hour for a total of $40,710 per year.
  • In San Jose, CA, a CNA can expect to make $19.05 per hour for a total of $39,620 per year.

By state

At the state level, states with higher costs of living also have CNA jobs with the highest pay rates.

  • In Alaska, CNAs make an average of $19.15 per hour for a total of $39,830 per year.
  • In New York, CNAs make an average of $17.79 per hour for a total of $37,010 per year.
  • In Hawaii, CNAs make an average of $17.20 per hour for a total of $35,770 per year.
  • In California, CNAs make an average of $16.93 per hour for a total of $35,220 per year.

As of 2018, here is a table of the average CNA salary by state:

State

Hourly Wage

Monthly Salary

Annual Salary

Annual Salary Range

Alabama

$11.08

$1,921

$23,050

$17,440 - $30,100

Alaska

$18.24

$3,163

$37,950

$28,920 - $49,060

Arizona

$14.65

$2,539

$30,470

$24,020 - $38,510

Arkansas

$11.53

$1,998

$23,970

$19,090 - $30,070

California

$16.13

$2,797

$33,560

$23,750 - $48,490

Colorado

$15.41

$2,670

$32,040

$24,040 - $39,910

Connecticut

$15.85

$2,748

$32,970

$24,630 - $43,260

Delaware

$14.30

$2,478

$29,740

$23,600 - $37,500

District of Columbia

$16.43

$2,848

$34,170

$25,240 - $45,830

Florida

$12.47

$2,161

$25,930

$20,460 - $32,510

Georgia

$11.94

$2,070

$24,840

$18,040 - $33,940

Hawaii

$16.08

$2,787

$33,440

$25,540 - $43,810

Idaho

$12.72

$2,204

$26,450

$20,610 - $34,170

Illinois

$13.35

$2,314

$27,770

$20,970 - $37,380

Indiana

$12.53

$2,173

$26,070

$20,840 - $32,210

Iowa

$13.60

$2,358

$28,300

$21,670 - $36,590

Kansas

$12.16

$2,108

$25,290

$20,560 - $31,220

Kentucky

$12.46

$2,160

$25,920

$19,860 - $34,050

Louisiana

$10.52

$1,823

$21,880

$16,790 - $28,940

Maine

$13.10

$2,271

$27,250

$20,910 - $35,430

Maryland

$14.65

$2,539

$30,470

$22,380 - $39,350

Massachusetts

$15.55

$2,695

$32,340

$25,500 - $40,610

Michigan

$14.04

$2,433

$29,200

$22,090 - $37,530

Minnesota

$15.65

$2,713

$32,560

$24,770 - $41,710

Mississippi

$10.96

$1,899

$22,790

$16,980 - $29,840

Missouri

$12.19

$2,113

$25,360

$18,540 - $33,770

Montana

$13.01

$2,256

$27,070

$21,090 - $35,280

Nebraska

$13.29

$2,304

$27,650

$21,420 - $35,420

Nevada

$16.58

$2,873

$34,480

$26,340 - $47,030

New Hampshire

$14.91

$2,583

$31,000

$23,100 - $39,790

New Jersey

$14.14

$2,450

$29,400

$21,870 - $38,710

New Mexico

$13.00

$2,254

$27,050

$20,070 - $36,530

New York

$16.87

$2,923

$35,080

$24,080 - $47,540

North Carolina

$11.87

$2,057

$24,680

$17,930 - $31,730

North Dakota

$15.81

$2,740

$32,880

$25,210 - $40,950

Ohio

$12.85

$2,228

$26,740

$20,780 - $34,570

Oklahoma

$11.91

$2,064

$24,770

$19,920 - $31,160

Oregon

$15.48

$2,683

$32,190

$23,430 - $42,440

Pennsylvania

$14.43

$2,501

$30,010

$22,350 - $38,910

Rhode Island

$14.68

$2,545

$30,540

$22,780 - $40,440

South Carolina

$11.93

$2,068

$24,810

$18,210 - $31,840

South Dakota

$12.48

$2,164

$25,970

$20,530 - $32,160

Tennessee

$12.07

$2,091

$25,090

$19,420 - $31,890

Texas

$12.69

$2,199

$26,390

$19,340 - $35,960

Utah

$12.57

$2,179

$26,150

$21,040 - $31,930

Vermont

$14.29

$2,477

$29,720

$23,070 - $37,890

Virginia

$13.42

$2,327

$27,920

$20,180 - $36,160

Washington

$14.62

$2,534

$30,410

$24,360 - $38,710

West Virginia

$12.50

$2,166

$25,990

$20,090 - $33,630

Wisconsin

$13.86

$2,403

$28,830

$21,840 - $37,320

Wyoming

$14.41

$2,498

$29,970

$22,650 - $38,560

Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics

The top 10 highest-paying states, from highest to lowest, are as follows:

State

Hourly Wage

Monthly Salary

Annual Salary

Annual Salary Range

Alaska

$18.24

$3,163

$37,950

$28,920 - $49,060

New York

$16.87

$2,923

$35,080

$24,080 - $47,540

Nevada

$16.58

$2,873

$34,480

$26,340 - $47,030

District of Columbia

$16.43

$2,848

$34,170

$25,240 - $45,830

California

$16.13

$2,797

$33,560

$23,750 - $48,490

Hawaii

$16.08

$2,787

$33,440

$25,540 - $43,810

Connecticut

$15.85

$2,748

$32,970

$24,630 - $43,260

North Dakota

$15.81

$2,740

$32,880

$25,210 - $40,950

Minnesota

$15.65

$2,713

$32,560

$24,770 - $41,710

Massachusetts

$15.55

$2,695

$32,340

$25,500 - $40,610

Career Outlook for CNAs

Certified nursing assistants, or CNAs, are a very important part of the healthcare system in this country, and their role will become much more important over the next decade. This is due to the fact that the population of older adults will grow rapidly over the coming years. In fact, the number of Americans aged 65 and older will double from 52 million (in 2018) to 95 million by 2060, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

 

Approximately 1.45 million CNAs are employed in the United States today, and this number is expected to rise quickly over the next eight years—as fast as the average of all other occupations in the United States. Growth in the number of older adults in this country means growth in the number of certified nursing assistants needed to care for them.

 

Some experts believe that someone turning 65 today will have nearly a 70% chance of needing some type of long-term care services, such as help with activities of daily living (ADLs) in their remaining years. In addition, the rise in the number of Americans living with Alzheimer’s disease is expected to grow to almost 14 million by 2050, from 5.8 million in 2019. Many people with this type of disease will need long-term care either at home, in assisted living facilities, nursing homes, or any other settings in which CNA jobs are located. 

Conclusion

It’s no secret that excellent patient or resident care is impossible without CNAs. Treating people with respect and ensuring their dignity is noble work. Moreover, the demand for CNAs is growing faster than for workers in nearly every other job, as the overall employment rate is projected to grow 9% from 2018 to 2018, faster than the average for all occupations. Finally,, CNAs can always go back to school to seek more opportunities in nursing careers as licensed practical or vocational nurses or registered nurses.



Additional Resources

  • If you're a CNA or caregiver who wants to make more money, read our tips for ways to boost your paycheck!
  • Have you been in the business for awhile? If you're ready to start a private home care business, here are our steps for setting up your business for success.
  • If you're inspired to brush up on your resume, check out our CNA resume guide—complete with a free resume template, tips for writing a great resume, and pointers for common interview questions!

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